Wild Billy's Circus Story

bluelightseven:

buttart:

saccharinescorpion:

talking about Rosie The Riveter, fun fact: while the We Can Do It picture has become the most-well known depiction of her in modern times, it wasn’t really a famous image when it was made—in fact, it wasn’t even intended to be her

the most famous depiction of Rosie The Riveter during WWII was probably Norman Rockwell’s painting 

image

note what she’s resting her foot on

unf

Cosplaying with sandwiches, yo.  This artwork is a gift.

stephen-fry-me:

The laws of God, the laws of man,
He may keep that will and can;
Not I: let God and man decree
Laws for themselves and not for me;
And if my ways are not as theirs
Let them mind their own affairs.
Their deeds I judge and much condemn,
Yet when did I make laws for them?
Please yourselves, say I,…

Bruce Springsteen - State Trooper (Trentemøller Mix)

“Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and a little music played out of doors by somebody I do not know.”
― John Keats

“Give me books, French wine, fruit, fine weather and a little music played out of doors by somebody I do not know.”


John Keats

A Disney Rejection Letter: No Women need apply

A Disney Rejection Letter: No Women need apply

"Like most others, I was a seeker, a mover, a malcontent, and at times a stupid hell-raiser. I was never idle long enough to do much thinking, but I felt somehow that some of us were making real progress, that we had taken an honest road, and that the best of us would inevitably make it over the top. At the same time, I shared a dark suspicion that the life we were leading was a lost cause, that we were all actors, kidding ourselves along on a senseless odyssey. It was the tension between these two poles - a restless idealism on one hand and a sense of impending doom on the other - that kept me going."
  Hunter S. Thompson, The Rum Diary


"Like most others, I was a seeker, a mover, a malcontent, and at times a stupid hell-raiser. I was never idle long enough to do much thinking, but I felt somehow that some of us were making real progress, that we had taken an honest road, and that the best of us would inevitably make it over the top. At the same time, I shared a dark suspicion that the life we were leading was a lost cause, that we were all actors, kidding ourselves along on a senseless odyssey. It was the tension between these two poles - a restless idealism on one hand and a sense of impending doom on the other - that kept me going."


  Hunter S. Thompson, The Rum Diary


The NHS is as great as Magna Carta
I am a very old man so I have strong memories of Britain before the NHS. I remember my sister dying of TB in a workhouse infirmary and me almost succumbing to whopping cough b/c we couldn’t afford a doctor.
As a small boy, I remember hearing screams coming from a home on our street where a woman was dying of cancer without any medicine to relieve her pain. It was a barbaric world where money decided who lived and who died because that was the formula for medical care.
In fact it wasn’t until I was 18 that I saw a physician and that was because World War Two was on and I had volunteered to join the RAF. The people of my generation sacrificed so much during the Great Depression and through the World War. The NHS was our reward, our peace time dividend. It was also our solemn pledge to future generations that we would be a civilized nation that would treat all citizens as worthy of care and compassion.
The NHS is for me as great as Magna Carta because it freed millions from the tyranny of sickness and poverty to move forward and lead productive lives. No one can fool me about these new measures. They are not about making the NHS more efficient, more accessible and more accountable to today’s economic situation; its all about profit. Now a small minority of people and corporations are going to get very rich while making Britain a less healthy and vibrant nation.
The names of all that voted for these provisions should be cut into a memorial stone to commemorate the death of Britain’s greatest achievement the NHS.

Harry Leslie Smith - 26/04/13

I am a very old man so I have strong memories of Britain before the NHS. I remember my sister dying of TB in a workhouse infirmary and me almost succumbing to whopping cough b/c we couldn’t afford a doctor.


As a small boy, I remember hearing screams coming from a home on our street where a woman was dying of cancer without any medicine to relieve her pain. It was a barbaric world where money decided who lived and who died because that was the formula for medical care.


In fact it wasn’t until I was 18 that I saw a physician and that was because World War Two was on and I had volunteered to join the RAF. The people of my generation sacrificed so much during the Great Depression and through the World War. The NHS was our reward, our peace time dividend. It was also our solemn pledge to future generations that we would be a civilized nation that would treat all citizens as worthy of care and compassion.


The NHS is for me as great as Magna Carta because it freed millions from the tyranny of sickness and poverty to move forward and lead productive lives. No one can fool me about these new measures. They are not about making the NHS more efficient, more accessible and more accountable to today’s economic situation; its all about profit. Now a small minority of people and corporations are going to get very rich while making Britain a less healthy and vibrant nation.

The names of all that voted for these provisions should be cut into a memorial stone to commemorate the death of Britain’s greatest achievement the NHS.

Harry Leslie Smith - 26/04/13

“If you could only tell them that living and spending isn’t the same thing! But it’s no good. If only they were educated to live instead of earn and spend, they could manage very happily.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley’s Lover

“If you could only tell them that living and spending isn’t the same thing! But it’s no good. If only they were educated to live instead of earn and spend, they could manage very happily.”

D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley’s Lover

brofiling:

white privilege radically changes the appearance of Tsarnaev bros
This is how brofiling actually works in real life. The Week Magazine ran with this image as their cover sketch.
Just so it is said, clearly and unambiguously: the Tsarnaev brothers are white guys. They are white. The FBI’s own wanted poster for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev lists his race as “white”, but you would never know it from the cover image on The Week.
Hold up the cover to someone else, and ask them how many white people they can see on the cover. Chances are they will identify Gabby Giffords on the top left and the image of the Boston policemen (all white men) on the top right, but how about those two guys in the center? Nope, not a chance that anyone would say these caricatures look white.
Why? Because in addition to being white they are also “Muslim”, which is the current dehumanizing “Other” that whiteness has constructed as a sanctioned target for violence in US popular culture.
This is how white privilege works in media representations and everyday life: when the criminal suspects are demonstrably white men, seize upon any aspect of difference and magnify it such that they become Othered, non-white, and menacing. If it is too hard to do so, simply dismiss them as aberrations and isolated cases of insanity. This is also how white culture, specifically the process of whiteness in conjunction with white privilege, portrays several non-white identities, including those that are now considered white but at one time were decidedly not so. For example, see here for how the Irish were depicted as violent apes or lazy drunks in the late 1800s to early 1900s.

brofiling:

white privilege radically changes the appearance of Tsarnaev bros

This is how brofiling actually works in real life. The Week Magazine ran with this image as their cover sketch.

Just so it is said, clearly and unambiguously: the Tsarnaev brothers are white guys. They are white. The FBI’s own wanted poster for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev lists his race as “white”, but you would never know it from the cover image on The Week.

Hold up the cover to someone else, and ask them how many white people they can see on the cover. Chances are they will identify Gabby Giffords on the top left and the image of the Boston policemen (all white men) on the top right, but how about those two guys in the center? Nope, not a chance that anyone would say these caricatures look white.

Why? Because in addition to being white they are also “Muslim”, which is the current dehumanizing “Other” that whiteness has constructed as a sanctioned target for violence in US popular culture.

This is how white privilege works in media representations and everyday life: when the criminal suspects are demonstrably white men, seize upon any aspect of difference and magnify it such that they become Othered, non-white, and menacing. If it is too hard to do so, simply dismiss them as aberrations and isolated cases of insanity. This is also how white culture, specifically the process of whiteness in conjunction with white privilege, portrays several non-white identities, including those that are now considered white but at one time were decidedly not so. For example, see here for how the Irish were depicted as violent apes or lazy drunks in the late 1800s to early 1900s.

"Among other things, you’ll find that you’re not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You’re by no means alone on that score, you’ll be excited and stimulated to know. Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. You’ll learn from them—if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It’s a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn’t education. It’s history. It’s poetry."  J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

"Among other things, you’ll find that you’re not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You’re by no means alone on that score, you’ll be excited and stimulated to know. Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. You’ll learn from them—if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It’s a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn’t education. It’s history. It’s poetry."

  J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye

The greatest part of Veronica Mars?

Every time there is a surprise for her or hinted at for her, she happily shouts about it being a pony. Gotta love a girl for consistency.

We are living in a culture entirely hypnotized by the illusion of time, in which the so-called present moment is felt as nothing but an infinitesimal hairline between an all-powerfully causative past and an absorbingly important future. We have no present. Our consciousness is almost completely preoccupied with memory and expectation. We do not realize that there never was, is, nor will be any other experience than present experience. We are therefore out of touch with reality. We confuse the world as talked about, described, and measured with the world which actually is. We are sick with a fascination for the useful tools of names and numbers, of symbols, signs, conceptions and ideas.
Alan Watts
"I sometimes seem to myself to wander around the world merely accumulating material for future nostalgias." 
Vikram Seth

"I sometimes seem to myself to wander around the world merely accumulating material for future nostalgias."
 

Vikram Seth